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  • Moira

Milberry Green Meadows Crafts: How to Create a Christmas Wreath

I first made a Christmas wreath when I was on a weekend away with girlfriends on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia. We stayed in a little cottage on the water, with no TV but plenty of good food, good company and lots of crafting! Now it's become a personal tradition to make a fresh wreath every year, bringing back so many happy memories. This is a great craft to do with children who enjoy foraging and making their own little wreaths for their bedroom doors. (I've included links to some of the products I used and just so you know, we do get a small commission if you buy anything.)



  • Start by gathering your materials. The first thing is a trip to the garden or nearby woods for evergreens, pine cones and other bits and pieces. This year I included some pussy willow and silver leaves that my aunt had given me.


  • I had some pine cones that I had sprayed gold from a previous year so I threw those in too.



  • Next you need a hoop. You can make one by bending an old wire hanger, but I bought one like this and just reuse it every year.


  • You will also need something to attach your greens to your hoop. I use florist wire, but jute string or even cable ties will do, although they are slightly more fiddly.



  • Start by taking a piece of evergreen and winding your wire around it to attach it to the hoop. No doubt actual florists have a fancy technique for doing this, but I just wind round and round along the stem. You can leave some fronds free or wind it tightly, depending on your preference. Our cat, Yuri, was very interested!



  • As you finish attaching one piece of evergreen, tuck the stem of the next one under the piece you have just finished. Keep winding the wire round and round.

  • Once you have a base, it's time to get creative. This year I used pussy willow, but you might want to add some berries or a contrasting leaf colour for interest.



  • Finally, I added my pine cones and a spray of silver leaves, simply continuing to wind around with the wire. Pretty!



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